Former Conrail employee alleges toxic materials caused cancer

While asbestos is a fairly well-known carcinogenic, it's sadly not the only hazardous material in Ohio – or across the nation – that can prove life-threatening. In another state, a man is apparently experiencing first-hand just what those consequences of prolonged exposure to toxic materials can be. The ex-train trackman and machine operator has filed a legal complaint alleging that he developed bladder cancer as a result.

The lawsuit accuses Conrail of disregarding the Federal Employers Liability Act by exposing the plaintiff to a number of hazardous materials over the course of his employment. He worked as a machine operator and trackman for the defendant for a total of 7 years. It was during this time that he was allegedly exposed to excessive, harmful amounts of toxic materials.

The hazardous substances included – but were not limited to – creosote, diesel exhaust and benzene, among possible others. The plaintiff asserts that it was his exposure to these substances during his daily work that caused or contributed to his development of bladder cancer, wholly or in part. The lawsuit charges that by failing to minimize or eliminate this exposure, the defendants violated FELA when they negligently failed to provide the plaintiff, their employee, with a safe workplace.

Because of his hazardous work conditions, the plaintiff claims that in addition to physical suffering, he also endured irritation and annoyance, emotional distress and inconvenience as well as loss of enjoyment of life, among other distresses. The lawsuit is requesting damages in excess of $50,000 plus all court costs. Residents of Ohio who find themselves similarly suffering injury or illness as a direct result of exposure to toxic materials may wish to discuss their options for compensation and justice with an experienced attorney in their own state.

Source: pennrecord.com, "Former trackman and machine operator says his bladder cancer a result of Conrail exposing him to toxic substances", Nicholas Malfitano, Sept. 21, 2017

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