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February 2020 Archives

Roundup litigation is bringing the dangers of glysophate to light

Living in nearly any of Ohio's residential neighborhoods means keeping your lawn looking good. For many people, this means using some sort of weed killer such as Roundup. When it came on the market back in the 1970s, the general public was not made aware of its dangers. In recent years, however, Roundup litigation has brought those dangers to light.

Ohio workers in numerous industries suffer due to asbestos

Ohio has a wide and diverse number of industries, such as construction workers, steel workers, auto workers, brick layers, plumbers, electricians and railroad workers just to name a few. Many of them are hard workers who are just taking care of themselves and their families. They never expected that working in their chosen industry would cause them to suffer harm due to exposure to asbestos.

The FDA recently approved a new treatment for mesothelioma

After believing he or she escaped the consequences of asbestos exposure, an Ohio resident could receive a devastating diagnosis decades later. The incubation period for mesothelioma can be up to 50 years, and by the time it is diagnosed, a patient could no longer benefit from surgery or radiation. Under these circumstances, a new device may help.

FDA issues Class I recall for defective insulin pumps

Ohio residents who live with Type 1 diabetes may discover their lives are in jeopardy. Medtronic manufactures an insulin pump called the MiniMed that comes in two versions -- one for people age 16 and up and one for children ages 7 and up. The Food and Drug Administration recently issued a Class I recall for certain lots of the MiniMed due to a problem with a missing or broken retainer ring.

Asbestos could be lurking in Ohio's older school buildings

School districts across the country, including here in Ohio, still use buildings constructed with materials that could contain questionable substances. For instance, asbestos could be present in many of those buildings. As long as those materials are not disturbed, they are presumed safe. However, when there are cracks, holes or other damage to them, they could become dangerous to students, teachers and staff at the school in question.

Cybersecurity concerns make some medical devices dangerous

Some technology allows doctors to monitor patients remotely as they go about their lives. Other medical devices allow monitoring of patients from a central location, such as a nursing station for hospitalized patients here in Ohio and elsewhere. The latter became the subject of a warning from the Food and Drug Administration after GE Healthcare issued a letter in Nov. 2019 regarding concerns that the company's Clinical Information Central Stations and Telemetry Servers could be vulnerable to cyber-attacks.

Can you hold a drug company responsible for your illness?

You expect that when your Ohio doctor prescribes you a medication, it is safe for you to take. Unfortunately, it has become clear that is not always the case. More medications, including those containing ranitidine, can put your long-term health at risk due to the presence of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), which is a human carcinogen.

Nizatidine added to list of medications recalled for NDMA

Since Sept. 2019, more and more drug recalls have surfaced regarding heartburn medications containing ranitidine, the most popular of which is Zantac. Once the recalls started, they continued to expand to include nearly all brands of this medication.

Is heat during shipping and storing to blame for Zantac recall?

Since the recalls of products containing ranitidine began last year, the Food and Drug Administration, along with consumers here in Ohio and elsewhere, pharmaceutical companies and researchers have been asking why N-nitrosodimethylamine was found in unsafe concentrations in the popular heartburn medication. Now, there could finally be some clues as to why the Zantac debacle occurred. Emery Pharma's initial reports may provide promising answers, which could ultimately reveal how to make the medication safe again.

FDA warns of hazardous materials in the operating room

As is the case anywhere else in the country, operating rooms in Ohio's hospitals and surgery centers need to be as sterile as possible in order to help reduce the risk of serious infection to the patient. Anytime the internal structures of the body are exposed, the patient's life is jeopardized not only from the procedure itself, but also from everything in the room. If the materials and tools used are not properly sterilized, they become hazardous materials and a source of infection for the patient.

Mesothelioma is a real risk for firefighters

All first responders here in Ohio and elsewhere deserve accolades for putting their lives on the line for the other members of their communities. Firefighters in particular put their lives at risk every time they go into a burning building. They heroically fight the chaos they can see, but the unknown enemies they face could put their health at risk. For instance, some of them could end up suffering from mesothelioma due to the presence of asbestos dust and fibers in a building they go into.

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