Johnson & Johnson responsible for toxic materials in baby powder

For as far as science and technology has helped advanced humanity, it can still be decidedly difficult to decipher just how much of a threat certain products pose. Most Ohio consumers assume that the products they purchase and then bring into their homes are safe, but despite safety protocols those assumptions could be misguided. Johnson & Johnson was recently blamed for the death of a woman suffering from ovarian cancer that she claimed was caused by toxic materials in its product.

Talc was once a common ingredient in baby powder produced by the company, but there is also a link between the substance and ovarian cancer. That link was first discovered when researchers found talc that had become incorporated with tissue from women suffering from the cancer. While some try to tout talc as a natural occurring mineral and therefore safe, naturally occurring talc is also frequently contaminated with asbestos.

Johnson & Johnson were likely aware of the link as far back as 1997, when the victim first filed suit against the company. An internal memo acknowledged the link between their products and cancer. However, their failure to inform customers and make changes to their products spawned dozens of other lawsuits from women who suffered serious ill effects after using talc baby powder. Johnson & Johnson did eventually change the ingredients, but not until 2009, putting an untold number of women at risk for developing ovarian cancer. Although the woman who filed that lawsuit has since passed away, the company was recently ordered to pay $72 million for related damages

Toxic materials should never be present in consumer products, and yet recalls seem to make the news round in Ohio on an almost regular basis. The implications can range from mild to severe and can put certain at-risk people in even more danger. Victims and their families do not have to simply accept that companies can release dangerous products without any type of consequences, and can instead hold negligent manufacturers responsible for any related damages by successfully completing a products liability suit.

Source: inverse.com, "Scientists Don't Know Whether Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder Causes Cancer", Yasmin Tayag, Feb. 26, 2016

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